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Seven iconic hikes near Phoenix

If you’re in the mood for a challenging but rewarding hike, Phoenix is ready to deliver. The city boasts a variety of mountain trails that’ll have you scrambling over boulders, marveling at saguaros, and earning incredible views. Phoenix features over 200 miles of hiking trails, but these seven are among the most iconic mountain hikes in the city. Before you set out, make sure that you’re taking the necessary safety precautions. Phoenix is a dry, desert climate, so bring plenty of water(!!) and a fully charged cellphone, and wear sunscreen and protective gear. And, of course, read up on these Phoenix peaks to decide which is suitable for you before hitting the trail — consider distances and elevation gains carefully, and only attempt hikes that you're confident you are physically capable of completing safely. Piestewa Peak Located smack dab in Central Phoenix, Piestewa Peak is the third highest peak in the city, at 2,610 feet. “The Stairmaster” is an apt nickname for the out-and-back Summit Trail, which climbs 1,200 feet in 1.2 miles. Be prepared for a trail that rises dramatically almost from the get-go and only levels off occasionally. The hike gets more intense closer to the summit, with metal handrails to guide you up the trail. At the very top, hikers scramble up a few rocks to reach the apex. Your reward for all the effort? Epic views of all of metropolitan Phoenix. Camelback Mountain Named after the shape it takes on the skyline, Camelback Mountain is the highest point in Phoenix at 2,704 feet. There are two popular trails on this mountain: Echo Canyon, and Cholla, although Cholla Trail is currently closed for renovation. Some consider Cholla the easier of the two but make no mistake, both trails are a challenge. Expect to get dusty and sweaty as you scramble to reach the top, ascending a staggering and heart-pumping 1,280 feet in 1.2 miles. The steep slope begins not far from the trailhead, with railroad ties used as steps that help hikers navigate the rocky terrain. After the seemingly endless climbing, the work pays off with stunning city views and a deep sense of satisfaction. Mind your footing on the way back down for a 2.5-mile hike. The top of Camelback Mountain. Photo by Reuben Schulz, iStock Tom’s Thumb Located in the McDowell Mountains of Scottsdale, Tom’s Thumb was named after the first person to climb it, Arizona Mountaineering Club member Tom Kreuser. When you reach the end of the trail, you can’t miss the granite formation at the summit of this trail that looks like… yep, you guessed it: a thumb pointing toward the sky. Hikers will get an intense cardio workout as the trail ascends more than 1,300 feet in 2.5 miles. The stellar hike features switchbacks, scenic vistas, dramatic granite outcroppings, and desert flora and fauna. As you’re working up a sweat from start to finish, be sure to pause and take in the sweeping and stunning views of North Scottsdale and the surrounding area. The view from Tom’s thumb is particularly unforgettable. After enjoying the sights and a well-earned breather, simply hike out the way you came for a round-trip that’s about 5 miles. Siphon Draw to Flatiron Trail About 40 miles south of Phoenix, the Flatiron Trail is a hike that is simultaneously iconic, challenging, and totally epic. Part of the Superstition Mountains (“the Supes,” to locals), Flatiron towers high at 4,861 feet. Hikers can anticipate a 2,750-foot elevation gain if they hike this out and back 6-mile journey. Begin your hike at the Siphon Draw trailhead in Lost Dutchman State Park. The hike from Siphon Draw will take you into a canyon of the same name. This trail is 4 miles round trip and offers plenty of scenic Sonoran desert vistas untouched by development. Many hikers will turn around at the end of the Siphon Draw Trail. If you’re up for a steep climb and have the experience and stamina, scramble up Flatiron, sticking to the left to stay on course. Before you reach the top, you’ll have to scale a (gulp) 12-foot wall to reach the summit. Once you’re there, relax, revel in your accomplishment, and take in breathtaking views of the Apache Junction area. Sunset in the Sonoran Desert near Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by Brent_1, iStock Images Shaw Butte Trail Back in Central Phoenix, the Shaw Butte Trail in North Mountain Park is well-maintained and one of the easier mountain peak hikes in town. Parts of the trail are even paved, and it all kicks off at a well-developed visitors center. It’s relatively flat for the first mile, after which the course begins its reasonably steep climb. The trail dips and rises a few times before topping out at Shaw Butte, which stands high at 2,149 feet. At the summit, you can’t miss the radio towers and sweeping views of the Central Valley of the Sun. On your way back down, be sure to check out the concrete remnants of Cloud 9 Restaurant—a swanky spot that burned down in 1964—for a hike that’s around four miles total. Holbert Trail At more than 16,000 acres, South Mountain Park and Preserve is one the largest municipal parks in the entire country. Its Holbert Trail is one of the most popular hikes for one key and beautiful reason: Dobbins Overlook. Dobbins is the highest point in the park that is open to the public (at 2,330 feet), and it offers sweeping views of the entire Valley. By following this steep 2.5-mile hike that covers 1,100 vertical feet, hikers can reach this iconic viewpoint. Sure, you can drive to the top… but hiking the Holbert Trail and following the detour that leads to the Overlook is admittedly more rewarding. Once you’ve soaked up all the views, turn back the way you came – by the time you’ve returned to the trailhead, you’ll have hiked about 3.6 total miles. Lookout Mountain Summit Trail Lookout Mountain is a short peak hike that’s tucked away in a North Phoenix neighborhood, making it ideal for hikers who are short on time. Anticipate an elevation gain of about 400 feet in less than a mile. Near the summit, be prepared to do some scrambling on this mostly moderate trail. At the top, take in panoramic views of metro Phoenix before you head back down. __________ SPONSORED BY GEICO This content was produced in partnership with GEICO, Lonely Planet, and Budget Travel.

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Adventure

Six iconic experiences in Argentina

When traveling through Argentina for the first time, it can be daunting to nail down what to see and what to do. To help travelers enjoy Argentina’s expansive array of experiences, see below for six iconic Argentine adventures that can’t be missed: 1. Cheer at a fútbol match in Buenos Aires Credit: Visit Argentina Boasting the most soccer stadiums in the world, a trip to Buenos Aires is not complete without cheering loudly from the fan stands at a local soccer match. Sports fanatics can head to the Boca Juniors Museum and Bombonera stadium, or Estadio Alberto J. Armando as it’s officially called, home to Diego Maradona’s Boca Juniors, or to Núñez to visit the River Plate Stadium home of Boca’s arch rivals, River Plate. 2. Hike to a glacier in Los Glaciares National Park: Credit: Visit Argentina Located in Patagonia and recognized as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, Los Glaciares National Park is a wonderland of glacial landscapes, including the stunning Perito Moreno, viewable via ferry boat or even via a guided hiking trek. 3. Horseback ride through a Mendoza winery: Mendoza, most known for its Malbec, produces 70 percent of all the wine that is made in Argentina. An hour from the city, travelers can enjoy Argentina’s mountain landscape while on a horseback tour at one of the huge varieties of wineries. A few regions include Luján de Cuyo, Maipú or the Uco Valley. 4. Whale watch at Valdés Peninsula: Credit: Visit Argentina As one of South America’s finest wildlife reserves, the Valdés Peninsula offers hundreds of miles of coastline that wildlife such as orca whales, sea lions, elephant seals, Magellanic penguins and more call home. Travelers should try to catch a glimpse of the unique orca whale beaching phenomenon that happens biannually from March through May in Punta Norte and from September through December in Caleta Valdés. 5. Witness the rushing water of Iguazú Falls: Credit: Visit Argentina Argentina’s infamous Iguazú Falls, reaching nearly twice the width and height of Niagara Falls, are often considered one of the natural wonders of the world for good reason. On the Argentina side of the falls, the perfect place to take in the wonder is at Devil’s Throat or "Garganta del Diabo," accessible via a walkway across Río Iguazú. 6. Trek to the Salinas Grandes (or Salt Flats): Credit: Visit Argentina Discover Argentina’s vastly contrasting landscapes at the awe-inspiring salt flats or Salinas Grandes, located in the far north west of Argentina. There are a few tours across Salta and the surrounding regions and while there, travelers shouldn’t miss taking the Train in the Clouds or “Tren a las Nubes.” This content was produced in partnership with Visit Argentina.

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Space Tourism is Almost a Reality

Space Perspective, the “off-world travel company,” boasts that space tourism is on the horizon, literally. Space travel tourism is still a thing of the future, but as early as 2025, passengers can journey one-third of the way to space in the Spaceship Neptune. That’s 19 miles above the earth, higher than where U2 spy planes fly, and high enough to see the curvature of the planet’s atmosphere. For $125,000 a ride, that is. Spaceship Neptune is a high performance “space balloon.” It is made up of a balloon the length of a football stadium and a pressurized capsule with 360-panorama windows that seats eight passengers and a pilot. The capsule will be comfortable and accessible for people in various physical shape. And of course, it will be equipped with a refreshments bar and bathrooms. The six hour journey leaves before sunrise from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, where the Operations Center will be at the Launch and Landing Facility (LLF). Spaceship Neptune making its ascent from the Kennedy Space Center.Image provided by Space Perspective. The balloon will gently rise at about 12 miles per hour for two hours using hydrogen gas, cruise in the direction of the day’s prevailing winds for two hours 100,000 feet above 99% of the Earth’s atmosphere, and descend for two hours to land in the ocean where a ship will collect the passengers. Spaceship Neptune is regulated by the FAA Office of Commercial Spaceflight and has near zero-emissions. It is designed from similar NASA-proven technology to operate near the vacuum of space. It also has a partially pre-opened parachute as a backup descent system. “Space Perspective is bringing a fundamentally new capability to the Cape, which will enhance the offering we have in Florida for space-related research and tourism,” said Space Florida President and CEO Frank DiBello. If balloon space tourism sounds familiar, it’s because it’s building on a similar idea, World View, expert space entrepreneurs and husband-wife duo Taber MacCallum and Jane Poynter unveiled in 2013. Other space-related projects between the pair include designing and being crew members of Biosphere 2 in the 1990s, sending Google executive Alan Eustace in a record-setting balloon parachute dive in 2014, and advertising with KFC via a chicken sandwich in 2017. Now, as Founder and CEOs of Space Perspective, they are trying again. Poynter said, “We’re committed to fundamentally changing the way people have access to space – both to perform much-needed research to benefit life on Earth and to affect how we view and connect with our planet.” Space Perspective isn’t just about leisure. The company is working with NASA and is a preferred partner for the Citizen Astronaut Program, working with the nonprofit Space for Humanity, which will pay for the flights of citizens to serve as space ambassadors. The first un-crewed test flight is scheduled for early 2021 where Spaceship Neptune will fly research payloads to the edge of space. Future launch sites around the world may be in Alaska, Hawaii, and other international spaceports. Katelyn Milligan is a Budget Travel intern for Summer 2020. She is a student at Purdue University.

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Virtually hike the Appalachian trail using this app

Mid-March to early May is typically one of the busiest times on the Appalachian Trail, as NOBO (or North Bound in AT parlance) trekkers flood the southern terminus of the famous thru-hike in hopes of reaching Mt. Katahdin in Maine some 14 states and several months away. But this year, the Appalachian Trail is effectively closed to hikers – a result of stay-at-home orders and social distancing measures states across the country are using to combat the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. That's a big disappointment for those whose bags were carefully packed full of freeze-dried meals and ultra-light gear, but thanks to a new app for iOS, anyone can virtually hike the Appalachian Trail from wherever they might be trying to flatten the curve. Walk the Distance is designed to use your iPhone's pedometer feature to track the number of steps you take each day and chart that activity in terms of the Appalachian Trail's 2,200 miles (3,500 km) span. In other words, taking your pup on a walk through the neighborhood of a mile or so for a week will net you the equivalent of the Appalachian Approach Trail, which leads hikers from Amicalola Falls State Park to the true southern terminus of the trail at Springer Mountain, Georgia. Eventually, a stroll to the grocery store or pharmacy will correspond to the climb up Anthony's Nose in New York state, where the AT briefly hits its lowest point before traversing the Hudson River. There's also a social aspect to Walk the Distance that those cooped up at home might appreciate as a panacea to national and state parks that have shut down all across the country due to the spread of novel coronavirus. Using graphics from Google Maps, users see an icon with their profile picture pinpointing where they are on the AT based on their daily steps, along with icons showing where fellow Walk the Distance users are on their own virtual thru-hikes. The famous stone arch at Amicalola Falls State Park marks the start of the Appalachian Trail for many, leading to the true terminus on Springer Mountain © Laura Clay-Ballard / Getty ImagesTo enhance the sense of progress and friendly competition, checkpoints are built into the digital experience, corresponding with real-world shelters where you can "overnight" between workouts, along with natural viewpoints you might experience if you were really on the trail. It all adds up to a measure of the camaraderie that makes the AT so special, minus the packed shelters and early season rush on backcountry outhouses that come when the Appalachian Trail is at its most crowded. An Android version isn't due out till next year, but the creator of Walk the Distance is working on it – and hopes to eventually create versions for other classic United States thru-hikes, too, like the Pacific Crest Trail. Meanwhile, there's more hikes and long-distance achievements to tackle in Walk the Distance than just the AT – including trails in several national parks, including Yellowstone, and the Boston Marathon for runners. That's one more piece of virtual gear in the outdoor enthusiast's tool kit for getting through spring and summer cabin fever, in addition to a host of other virtual outdoor experiences you can check out. Those include 360-degree tours of national parks and online repositories of the kind of visitor center exhibits you might normally breeze past in your rush to the trailhead. It's not quite the same thing as sending your first 14'er or bungee jumping into the New River Gorge, but it does mean staying connected with well-loved, one-of-a-kind destinations until we can all get our trail legs again. This piece originally ran on our sister site, Lonely Planet.

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Would you pay $1000 to reserve a seat on a space flight?

Virgin Galactic, the Richard Branson-owned company, has targeted summer 2020 to debut its space-tourism service, and as the launch fast approaches, public interest in scoring a seat on a spaceship has skyrocketed. Though the ticket window slammed shut in December 2018, inquiries have continued to roll in – nearly 8000 online reservation registrations in the fourteen months since Virgin Galactic’s first spaceflight (more than double the number reported in September 2019) and 600-plus firm reservations to date. Last week, in preparation for the re-opening of spaceflight sales, Virgin Galactic announced its latest initiative, and it’s pretty much priority boarding or Global Entry on steroids. Called One Small Step, the program allows interested travelers to pay a refundable deposit of US$1000 to hold their place in line, so when the new seats become available, they’ll get first shot at the reservations. The company has targeted summer 2020 for the launch of its space-tourism program © Virgin Galactic“We have been greatly encouraged by the ongoing and increasing demand seen from around the world for personal spaceflight,” Virgin Galactic commercial director Stephen Attenborough said in a press release. “One Small Step allows us to help qualify and build confidence in our direct sales pipeline, as well as to ensure that those who are most keen to make reservations, are able to do so at the earliest opportunity.” Ticket prices have yet to be announced, but they're expected to go for upwards of US$250,000 © Virgin GalacticWhile details like cost and on-sale dates have yet to be announced, tickets were last priced at US$250,000, and they’re expected to go for more once the window reopens. “What we believe is that we actually underpriced the ticket price a bit in early years,” company CEO George Whitesides said last fall, adding that at some point, the goal is to lower the cost so space travel is more accessible to more people. In the meantime, however, those who can afford to pay the One Small Step fee will get first dibs on the new seats, “allowing them to make the One Giant Leap to a confirmed spaceflight reservation,” the press release reads. For more information, visit virgingalactic.com/smallstep. _____This article first appeared on our sister site, Lonely Planet.

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How to Plan An Unforgettable African Safari in 7 Easy Steps

Gearing up for an African safari requires more planning than most trips. Strategies around everything from clothing and photography, to safety and basic comforts are key – not to mention savvy luggage-packing to suit small airplanes and bumpy jeeps. For some, simple travel considerations can be doubly daunting when it’s a first-time visit to Africa. But with the right basic planning, a safari will not only feel comfortable, it can be the ultimate adventure. Check out these seven essentials for planning your dream safari in Africa. 1. Plan far in advance. Since an African safari is likely a bucket-list sort of trip for many travelers, planning well in advance is essential. There are many great safari countries to visit, including South Africa, Botswana, Kenya, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Tanzania, and others. To determine which is right for you, consider things like: which airports and airlines you prefer; what vaccines and visas are necessary for that nation; what animals dwell there; what currency and languages are most common; and what types of accommodations are offered. Once you narrow down the right destination, consider when to go. Prime animal viewing occurs during the dry winter months (usually June-August), when animals are forced to congregate around water sources. During the wet season, the bush is greener and wildlife is usually more dispersed around each reserve, but you'll likely find better rates and fewer tourists Just be sure that no matter when you go, stay flexible. Being on “Africa time” means going with the flow, and enjoying an easy pace – just like the animals you came to visit. 2. Pack the right wardrobe. Versatility and utility are the name of the clothing game. Above all, pack and wear layers, because you may be chilly for sunrise or sunset game drives, and baking in the midday sun. If your trip brings you to the city as well as to safari bush, you’ll want outfits that serve both scenes. (Fortunately, the safari look is always on trend in Africa.) For the safari itself, wear earth-toned colors like tan or natural green to serve as camouflage when spotting wildlife and to keep cool when the African sun heats up. Most pros believe that white and brighter pastel colors are the worst for safari, so leave the hot pinks at home. Cotton is comfortable, but you may find greater value in fabrics that are insect-resistant, offer SPF sun protection, and wick away moisture to feel cooler in the sun or warmer at night. Outdoorsy retailers like REI, Cabela’s, and LL Bean carry good safari-smart clothing lines. 3. Don't forget the essentials. You'll want sunglasses, a full-brimmed hat with a chin strap, and boots or thick rubber-soled shoes that are comfortable enough for short or long hikes. Wise travelers also know the value of a good buff (a stretchy tube of thin fabric), which can be worn as a scarf, headband, or face cover on dusty roads. Pay close attention to your travel toiletries. Many basic products may be hard to find in African stores, so pack favorite items that will cover your entire trip duration (including shampoo, lotion, soap, tampons, and toothpaste). And whatever you do, don’t skimp on sunscreen; but do try to use a fragrance-free one since mosquitoes are drawn to fresh scents. Across Africa, you’ll likely rely on bottled water. But you can easily avoid single-use plastic bottles if you bring your own reusable bottle, and refill with store-bought (or hotel-refilled) jugs of spring or purified water. (FYI Klean Kanteen makes sturdy, insulated stainless-steel bottles with good handles.) 4. Remember safety basics. When it comes to pre-trip vaccines, every country is different. So check with the US CDC’s travel site for which vaccines and medicines are recommended in your destinations, and consult your physician. (Note that where yellow-fever vaccines are required, you may need to pack your official “yellow card” vaccination record.) The US State Department also has an up-to-date international-travel site worth reading; plus it has a page dedicated to emergency preparedness while abroad. Here are a few core safety tips: drink only bottled water, avoid eating raw foods without peels, mind your sun protection, use hand sanitizer, and apply insect repellent and/or take antimalarial medicine (where needed). Also, pack a basic first-aid kit with medicines to help with headaches, heartburn, diarrhea, sunburn, bug bites, sore throat, and dry eyes. 5. Bring the right gear and tech. No matter where you go in Africa, never forget an electrical outlet adapter. A quick search on Amazon will turn up dozens of affordable choices, and it’s easy to score one that works in any country, with multiple USB plugs. While you’re at it, consider bringing a lightweight USB battery pack too, so you’ll always be able to recharge on the go. (Extra points if your USB battery doubles as a flashlight!) Safari is undoubtedly a top photography adventure, so the right camera and lenses are clutch. Having a great zoom lens is vital for capturing long-distance wildlife photos, so invest in a point-and-shoot with a killer zoom; or if you’re using an SLR body, then buy, borrow, or rent a telephoto lens. When you see your close-ups of elephants, zebra, rhinos, lions, and other African wildlife, you’ll be glad you made the effort. And while you’re thinking about cameras, consider bringing along a shower cap or plastic grocery bag, both of which make handy dust covers in an open-air jeep. 6. Enjoy all wildlife. So you’ve heard about the “big five” – lion, leopard, rhinoceros, elephant, and Cape buffalo – allegedly the most difficult animals in Africa to hunt on foot. Today, most safari-goers are only hunting to shoot pictures, but the big five remain the hot subject matter. In reality, an African game drive offers many more animals that will dazzle and delight you. So instead of obsessing with just five animals, be open to beholding the countless other magnificent creatures in their natural habitat: hippos, warthogs, giraffes, kudu, pythons, eagles, baboons, crocodiles, and so many more. 7. Explore both land and water. On land, jeeps can access remote corners of game reserves, change course if animals are tracked elsewhere, and alter speeds for better photography. But then, so can boats (though they’re admittedly less agile). Even better, river cruises let guests unpack only once while touring several areas, and connect to land safaris in various areas – so visitors can check out waterways and parks too, the best of both worlds. African river and lake cruising is growing more popular each year, especially with companies like CroisiEurope Cruises newly expanding their tours to Botswana, Namibia, and Zimbabwe. But if you prefer a land-only experience, be sure to research a few different game reserves and lodges to gauge which is right for you. For example, in South Africa, Jaci’s Lodges in the more compact Madikwe Game Reserve may suit you better than narrowing down the many tour operators inside sprawling Kruger National Park.

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The 10 Coolest Helicopter Tours in the World

We set out to find the most breathtaking helicopter excursions, from beautiful coral reefs and active volcanoes to stunning waterfalls and iconic city skylines. Here are our top ten helicopter tours. 1. The Grand Canyon, AZ Measuring 277 miles from east to west, the Grand Canyon is an immense chasm carved by the Colorado River. Featuring a unique ecosystem, the canyon is decorated with red rocks that reveal its ancient geological history – in fact, some studies suggest the canyon could be as old as 70 million years. Consider choosing a tour that flies over the Grand Canyon’s stunning South Rim, letting you soar over the widest and deepest part of the canyon. 2. Juneau, Alaska A helicopter tour is one of the best ways to take in Juneau Icefield, an endless horizon of ice-capped mountain ranges and flowing rivers of ice. Located just north of Alaska’s capital, the icefield is home to nearly 40 large glaciers. It stretches more than 1500 square miles, and is dotted with deep crevasses and azure blue ice. 3. Great Barrier Reef, Australia Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, one of the most sought-after tourist destinations around the globe, is one of the seven wonders of the natural world. Its sprawling reef system, which is spread over 1400 miles, boasts bright sand cays and more than 400 types of coral resting in crystal clear waters – all visible from up above in a scenic helicopter flight. 4. Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii See the fiery lava vents of one of the most active volcanoes in the world – from a safe distance aboard a helicopter. The volcano erupted in 2018, causing vigorous lava fountains to flow out that permanently changed the area’s landscape. For a fully immersive experience, take a doors-off helicopter tour of the volcano. 5. Niagara Falls, Ontario You’ll still able to hear the thundering roar of Niagara Falls when you’re looking down at the most powerful waterfall in North America. The falls straddle the international border between Canada and the US, but the Canadian side offers a favorable exchange rate that allows you to take a less-expensive helicopter tour of the three waterfalls that collectively form Niagara Falls. 6. Victoria Falls, Africa Care to travel a little farther to see the largest waterfall in the world? A helicopter tour of Victoria Falls in southern Africa on the Zambezi River offers beautiful views of one of Mother Nature’s most spectacular sights. Victoria Falls is the greatest curtain of falling water on the globe. It sprays more than five hundred million cubic meters of water per minute over an edge that plummets into a gorge more than hundred meters below, causing the sound of the falls to be heard from a distance of up 40 kilometers. 7. New York City, NY Flying in a helicopter over the island of Manhattan provides sweeping view of the Big Apple. You’ll get an up-close view of New York’s most iconic landmarks, from the Empire State Building and Times Square to Central Park and the Statue of Liberty, without having to deal with the throngs of tourists that roam the city on any given day. You’ll also enjoy a panoramic view of NYC’s iconic skyline. By the time you’re back on the ground, the city’s skyscrapers may not seem so tall anymore. 8. Nepal Explore the Himalayas by helicopter on a tour across Nepal’s high-altitude ranges. Soar over Everest Base Camp, the Khumbu Glacier, and Sagarmatha National Park Nepal, a UNESCO World Heritage site that contains areas of the Dudh Kosi river, Bhotekoshi river basin, and the Gokyo Lakes. Flying beats making the typical 12-day round trip trek by foot to Everest Base Camp. 9. Guatemala Only slightly larger than the state of Tennessee, Guatemala is home to volcanic trenches, rainforests, astounding Mayan ruins – including pyramids, temples, palaces, and fortresses – and the beautiful Lake Amatitlán, a popular tourist destination. This diverse landscape makes for a stunning helicopter ride. 10. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil From high above you’ll take in Rio de Janeiro’s white sand beaches, like Ipanema and Copacabana, the spectacular granite peak of Sugar Loaf Mountain, and, of course, the statue of Christ the Redeemer, the largest Art Deco-style sculpture in the world and a cultural icon of Brazil.